Snapshots

DRC is active in 40 countries throughout the world. Our snapshots offer a brief introduction to our field work and the lives we come across.

Seeking safety in Bosnia

Thousands of people have made their way to Bosnia and Herzegovina in search of a life without hunger, deprivation, and danger. They come from poverty-stricken and war-torn countries such as Syria, Pakistan, Iraq and Afghanistan. Many are forced to take shelter in abandoned buildings because the official reception centres are overcrowded, and many are plagued by illnesses, infections or injuries from violence. Several say they have attempted to cross the border into Croatia. Here they have been subjected to violence, robbed of their clothes and have had their belongings destroyed before being sent back across the border. The Danish Refugee Council is present in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where we distribute water, food, warm clothes, tents, and medicine. Pictured above, one of our staff members provides first aid to a man whose hand has been seriously injured.

Seeking safety in Bosnia

Thousands of people have made their way to Bosnia and Herzegovina in search of a life without hunger, deprivation, and danger. They come from poverty-stricken and war-torn countries such as Syria, Pakistan, Iraq and Afghanistan. Many are forced to take shelter in abandoned buildings because the official reception centres are overcrowded, and many are plagued by illnesses, infections or injuries from violence. Several say they have attempted to cross the border into Croatia. Here they have been subjected to violence, robbed of their clothes and have had their belongings destroyed before being sent back across the border. The Danish Refugee Council is present in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where we distribute water, food, warm clothes, tents, and medicine. Pictured above, one of our staff members provides first aid to a man whose hand has been seriously injured.

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Water in Somalia

In Somalia, poverty and drought are constantly causing enormous needs for humanitarian relief. The Danish Refugee Council is present with a wide range of efforts throughout the country. Our employees work tirelessly to: • Meet immediate needs by providing lifesaving services in a timely, dignified and appropriate manner. • Increase access to clean drinking water and improve access to hygiene and sanitation facilities through the distribution of hygiene kits and hygiene education. • Improve access to shelter, food and other life-saving relief for people in emergencies and crises. • Improve protection for children and women, e.g. through extensive case management and assistance for reunification. Pictured above, a boy fills up a water canister at a water supply built by the Danish Refugee Council near the town of Dollow.

Water in Somalia

In Somalia, poverty and drought are constantly causing enormous needs for humanitarian relief. The Danish Refugee Council is present with a wide range of efforts throughout the country. Our employees work tirelessly to: • Meet immediate needs by providing lifesaving services in a timely, dignified and appropriate manner. • Increase access to clean drinking water and improve access to hygiene and sanitation facilities through the distribution of hygiene kits and hygiene education. • Improve access to shelter, food and other life-saving relief for people in emergencies and crises. • Improve protection for children and women, e.g. through extensive case management and assistance for reunification. Pictured above, a boy fills up a water canister at a water supply built by the Danish Refugee Council near the town of Dollow.

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Creative activities in the Schisto camp

Greece is home to large numbers of refugees from countries such as Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. On a mandate from the Greek authorities, the Danish Refugee Council runs a number of camps where we provide everything from food, shelter and sanitation to local democracy, counselling and education. Pictured above, one of our staff performs creative activities with some of the children in the Schisto camp.

Creative activities in the Schisto camp

Greece is home to large numbers of refugees from countries such as Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. On a mandate from the Greek authorities, the Danish Refugee Council runs a number of camps where we provide everything from food, shelter and sanitation to local democracy, counselling and education. Pictured above, one of our staff performs creative activities with some of the children in the Schisto camp.

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Looking ahead

These two boys were born and raised in Ukraine. Their father was killed when his tractor was blown up by a landmine buried in his field. Now the family lives sparingly on the mother's income from the sale of milk and cheese, which comes from two cows. The Danish Refugee Council has helped the family with necessary repairs and maintenance of their house, and given them two beds and a table that they would not otherwise be able to afford. In addition to support of livelihood, the Danish Refugee Council also runs a wide range of other activities in Ukraine, including humanitarian mine clearance.

Looking ahead

These two boys were born and raised in Ukraine. Their father was killed when his tractor was blown up by a landmine buried in his field. Now the family lives sparingly on the mother's income from the sale of milk and cheese, which comes from two cows. The Danish Refugee Council has helped the family with necessary repairs and maintenance of their house, and given them two beds and a table that they would not otherwise be able to afford. In addition to support of livelihood, the Danish Refugee Council also runs a wide range of other activities in Ukraine, including humanitarian mine clearance.

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Cash for work

Mohammed and his family live as internally displaced in Yemen. They fled to Reida from the capital Sa'ada in 2015 because their house was destroyed by shelling. Via a ‘cash for work’ programme the Danish Refugee Council has helped Mohammed and his wife earn enough money to build a small shop selling local goods. The family now has an income that provides food for the children and other necessities. In Reida, our local cash for work programme is aimed at creating sanitary wastewater solutions that prevent the spread of dangerous waterborne illness. The project has both reduced a local cholera outbreak and created a livelihood for many internally displaced families who would otherwise find it difficult to cope.

Cash for work

Mohammed and his family live as internally displaced in Yemen. They fled to Reida from the capital Sa'ada in 2015 because their house was destroyed by shelling. Via a ‘cash for work’ programme the Danish Refugee Council has helped Mohammed and his wife earn enough money to build a small shop selling local goods. The family now has an income that provides food for the children and other necessities. In Reida, our local cash for work programme is aimed at creating sanitary wastewater solutions that prevent the spread of dangerous waterborne illness. The project has both reduced a local cholera outbreak and created a livelihood for many internally displaced families who would otherwise find it difficult to cope.

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A sewing machine can pave the way

More than 70 million people are seeking refuge from war – half of them are women. Female refugees are generally at greater risk of abuse than men, they find it harder to raise money to survive and are often single parents. In the Asraq camp in Jordan, many women have found refuge from the war in Syria. Typically, they arrive with their children, tired and worn out by the flight away from bombs and terrorist attacks. They have lost everything and are dependent on help to create a livelihood. Thanks to our sewing facilities, many of the women in the Asraq camp are now able to provide for their children. Here, a course and a sewing machine pave the way for an income, which gives the women food on the table, warm clothes in the winter, and enough ressources to send their children to school.

A sewing machine can pave the way

More than 70 million people are seeking refuge from war – half of them are women. Female refugees are generally at greater risk of abuse than men, they find it harder to raise money to survive and are often single parents. In the Asraq camp in Jordan, many women have found refuge from the war in Syria. Typically, they arrive with their children, tired and worn out by the flight away from bombs and terrorist attacks. They have lost everything and are dependent on help to create a livelihood. Thanks to our sewing facilities, many of the women in the Asraq camp are now able to provide for their children. Here, a course and a sewing machine pave the way for an income, which gives the women food on the table, warm clothes in the winter, and enough ressources to send their children to school.

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Child friendly space in Tanzania

In DRC’s 'child friendly spaces', children can come and stay in a safe environment. Our staff provide care and activities for the children, so that for a while they are allowed to forget everyday life and perhaps bad memories of war and flight. In Tanzania, hundreds of thousands of people have fled the civil war in Burundi. Both mothers and children enjoy coming and having a break in one of our child friendly spaces.

Child friendly space in Tanzania

In DRC’s 'child friendly spaces', children can come and stay in a safe environment. Our staff provide care and activities for the children, so that for a while they are allowed to forget everyday life and perhaps bad memories of war and flight. In Tanzania, hundreds of thousands of people have fled the civil war in Burundi. Both mothers and children enjoy coming and having a break in one of our child friendly spaces.

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Mariam, Nagwa and Sahar

This is Mariam, Nagwa and Sahar. Mariam is one of our staff members in the Markazi camp in Djibouti. Nagwa and Sahar are refugees from the war in Yemen. They work as volunteers in the camp where they speak with female refugees about their rights and possibilities in terms of help and support. Nagwa and Sahar like working for the DRC because it enables them to leave their camp homes and do something meaningful. “If I just sit at home doing nothing, I get bad thoughts about the war and everything that has happened to me and my family in Yemen,” says Nagwa.

Mariam, Nagwa and Sahar

This is Mariam, Nagwa and Sahar. Mariam is one of our staff members in the Markazi camp in Djibouti. Nagwa and Sahar are refugees from the war in Yemen. They work as volunteers in the camp where they speak with female refugees about their rights and possibilities in terms of help and support. Nagwa and Sahar like working for the DRC because it enables them to leave their camp homes and do something meaningful. “If I just sit at home doing nothing, I get bad thoughts about the war and everything that has happened to me and my family in Yemen,” says Nagwa.

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I look forward to going to school every morning

Tala is an 11-year-old girl who grew up to find herself in a conflict zone in her hometown Homs in Syria. When the conflict in Homs ended and life started to gradually return to normal, Tala looked forward to start going to school for the first time in her life. Sadly the war had left the local school massively damaged with doors and windows blown out, and toilets and water outlets destroyed. With the help of the Danish Refugee Council and with funding from the European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO), our shelter and infrastructure team in Homs were able to rehabilitate the school and provide the required equipment. “ I couldn’t believe it was the same school when I first saw it. I look forward to going to school every morning,” Tala says with a smile.

I look forward to going to school every morning

Tala is an 11-year-old girl who grew up to find herself in a conflict zone in her hometown Homs in Syria. When the conflict in Homs ended and life started to gradually return to normal, Tala looked forward to start going to school for the first time in her life. Sadly the war had left the local school massively damaged with doors and windows blown out, and toilets and water outlets destroyed. With the help of the Danish Refugee Council and with funding from the European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO), our shelter and infrastructure team in Homs were able to rehabilitate the school and provide the required equipment. “ I couldn’t believe it was the same school when I first saw it. I look forward to going to school every morning,” Tala says with a smile.

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Yusif keeps livestock healthy for thousands of IDP-households in Darfur

DRC taught me to be a community animal health worker. I treat donkeys, goats and sheep every day. Thousands of households in the area rely on me." Yusif was forced to flee his village and eventually found safety in Zalingei, the regional Capital in Central Darfur, where he joined DRC’s vocational training scheme. Here, Yusif received training on livestock and food security and, building on his knowledge, he finally managed to step into the role of Community Animal Health Worker.

Yusif keeps livestock healthy for thousands of IDP-households in Darfur

DRC taught me to be a community animal health worker. I treat donkeys, goats and sheep every day. Thousands of households in the area rely on me." Yusif was forced to flee his village and eventually found safety in Zalingei, the regional Capital in Central Darfur, where he joined DRC’s vocational training scheme. Here, Yusif received training on livestock and food security and, building on his knowledge, he finally managed to step into the role of Community Animal Health Worker.

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From Mines to Milk 💣🐄 #integrated #mineaction

#Cattlefarmers in Komyshuvakha #Ukraine only get water 4x a day for 15 min. Their key communal #waterwell is broken - and located between #minefields. Complicated #landproperty issues further prevented interventions. At #DanishRefugeeCouncil, with support from the #EuropeanUnion, we integrated our versatile expertise for a holistic response: ✔#demining began with clearance ✔#legal resolved the HLP problem ✔#protection engaged a local repair company ✔#EORE delivered mine safety session to repairmen ✔#livelihoods distributed cash grants to farmers "We are there, moving forward together."

From Mines to Milk 💣🐄 #integrated #mineaction

#Cattlefarmers in Komyshuvakha #Ukraine only get water 4x a day for 15 min. Their key communal #waterwell is broken - and located between #minefields. Complicated #landproperty issues further prevented interventions. At #DanishRefugeeCouncil, with support from the #EuropeanUnion, we integrated our versatile expertise for a holistic response: ✔#demining began with clearance ✔#legal resolved the HLP problem ✔#protection engaged a local repair company ✔#EORE delivered mine safety session to repairmen ✔#livelihoods distributed cash grants to farmers "We are there, moving forward together."

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Getting back to school in the borderland areas of southern Tunisia

In southern Tunisia, schools in refugee hosting communities in the borderland areas of Dhehiba, Benguerdene and Medenine are preparing for children to return to school after having been closed due to Covid-19. As DRC is already delivering a Violence Prevention project along the borders, we are also keen to assist hosting communities and relevant authorities in the overall efforts to secure a safe learning environment for the children in these challenging pandemic times. DRC is, therefore, providing PPE equipment, thermometers and sanitation supplies to four schools as well as white boards, markers, notebooks and pens, which will provide for a fresh start for the pupils, which include refugee children.

Getting back to school in the borderland areas of southern Tunisia

In southern Tunisia, schools in refugee hosting communities in the borderland areas of Dhehiba, Benguerdene and Medenine are preparing for children to return to school after having been closed due to Covid-19. As DRC is already delivering a Violence Prevention project along the borders, we are also keen to assist hosting communities and relevant authorities in the overall efforts to secure a safe learning environment for the children in these challenging pandemic times. DRC is, therefore, providing PPE equipment, thermometers and sanitation supplies to four schools as well as white boards, markers, notebooks and pens, which will provide for a fresh start for the pupils, which include refugee children.

Spapshot Tunisia 13.11.2020