What happens if asylum is not granted?

If an asylum seeker is refused asylum and thus a residence permit as a refugee, the asylum case is automatically appealed to the Refugee Appeals Board. The Refugee Board is a court-like, independent administrative body that acts as an appeal body in asylum cases. If an asylum seeker is refused asylum, the applicant is entitled to free legal support from a lawyer who can represent them during the Refugee Appeals Board's processing of the appeal.

Subsequently, the Refugee Appeals Board convenes a meeting where the applicant and the lawyer present the asylum case. There is an interpreter present who has a duty of confidentiality.

If you have problems understanding the interpreter, it is important to tell the Refugee Appeals Board.

The Refugee Appeals Board consists of three members, and the chair of the meeting is a judge. At the meeting with the Refugee Appeals Board, there will also be a secretary for the Refugee Appeals Board, who writes a report of the board meeting, and a representative from the Danish Immigration Service, who will present the reasons why the Danish Immigration Service has refused a residence permit as a refugee.

The Refugee Appeals Board can either decide that an applicant should be granted asylum and a residence permit as a refugee and thereby reverse the Danish Immigration Service's decision or confirm the Danish Immigration Service's refusal.

If the Refugee Appeals Board confirms the Danish Immigration Service's refusal of a residence permit as a refugee, the decision is final, and no further appeal can be made. Nor can the refusal be appealed to the ordinary courts.

If the Refugee Appeals Board decides that the applicant should have a residence permit as a refugee in Denmark, the Danish Immigration Service will subsequently issue a residence permit and decide where to live (housing location).