Spring Recharge - video

Water scarcity is perceived to be a problem in many parts of the world and this shift is often attributed to climate change. In Uganda, Yemen, Kenya and Uganda, DRC has actively been supporting landscape design for regenerative groundwater recharge, turning floods into food and adapting landscapes from fragile to fertile.

Spring Recharge Video

Water scarcity is perceived to be a problem in many parts of the world and this shift is often attributed to climate change. In Uganda, Yemen, Kenya and Uganda, DRC has actively been supporting landscape design for regenerative groundwater recharge.

About the video

Water scarcity is perceived to be a problem in many parts of the world and this shift is often attributed to climate change. However, short water cycles are disrupted when ecological health is dismantled through deforestation, soil erosion, pollution and biodiversity loss.

In Uganda, Yemen, Kenya and Uganda, DRC has actively been supporting landscape design for regenerative groundwater recharge. By engineering the landscape with passive water harvesting structures, we allow water to slow, spread and sink deep in to the soils so they can help in recharge of ground water tables as well as boreholes and spring.

Water security is constantly a major consideration in the context of forced displacement and DRC recognises that by applying regenerative design to local water cycles, we can help to restore agroecosytem health and community resilience while reducing flood and drought. By doing so, we turn floods in to food and landscapes from fragile to fertile.

With DRC Global Strategy 2025, DRC will proactively invest more into climate adaptation - a pillar of our DRC Climate Framework

The approach illustrated in the video is implemented by DRC with funding from DANIDA and the Royal Danish Embassy in Uganda under the Northern Uganda Resilience Initiative (NURI).