Ukraine

Country Facts

DRC present since:

1998

Staff on location:

220

Displaced population:

730,000

DRC Hotlines: For people in need in and around Ukraine

Protection support: +38 095 430 5497 / +38 050 393 39 43 

Legal assistance: +38 073 122 74 64 / +38 095 364 28 10 / +38 063 214 52 31 / +38 063 543 15 85 / +38 050 399 01 39 / +38 063 102 17 63 / +38 095 275 98 71 / +38 095 861 30 95 

Border crossing
Read this guide:

More information on DRC Ukraine Facebook page 

Hotline for Ukrainians in Denmark:
Psychosocial support +45 33 73 53 14 (9-10 am and 5-6pm CET) with support for children, adolescents and their parents to cope with difficulties and new life circumstances.
 

Displacement Situation

DRC is in Ukraine, responding to the evolving humanitarian crisis - providing support as well to people affected by displacement in neighbouring countries, the wider Europa and in Denmark.  

DRC Crisis Response Ukraine 2022 (PDF)

DISPLACEMENT TRACKING: See OCHA’s Ukraine Data Explorer (humdata.org) and UNHCR’s overview of the refugee influx from Ukraine into neighbouring countries: Situation Ukraine Refugee Situation (unhcr.org)  

DRC Response

DRC has more than 220 Ukrainian staff and a small group of international advisors in the country. At current, DRC has relocated coordination of activities from the capital Kyiv in northern Ukraine and field offices in the Donbas region, to new offices established in the western part of the country.  

Nearly all DRC’s staff in Ukraine – more than half of them previously based in the eastern Donbas region in eastern Ukraine - are currently internally displaced, but they remain committed to continue working and help respond to the crisis in their country from new DRC offices and areas across the country where they have found refuge.  

Due to the nature of the ongoing crisis and escalation of active combat actions, control of areas changes daily. This is impacting critical access for humanitarian aid to reach people in need. DRC is taking these factors into consideration in the response planning and implementation of remote management frameworks – including through a vast and growing network of partners within and around Ukraine. 

DRC interventions within Ukraine focuses on two directions:  

  • Launch and scale up of an emergency response 
  • Reprogramming of ongoing projects  

DRC’s emergency response in Ukraine is centred around the following DRC core sectors:  

Protection activities including legal aid, advocacy, psycho-social support, targeted individual assistance, conflict mediation/prevention between IDPs and host communities. Economic Recovery through food security, livelihoods support and distribution of Non-food Items (NFIs). Humanitarian Disarmament & Peacebuilding through Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) and Explosive Ordnance recording and assistance to State Emergency Services, and Explosive Ordnance in areas recently contaminated and safe to access. Shelter & Settlements activities such as shelter repairs.  

DRC implements directly and through NGOs, charity organisations, universities, private initiatives and others – to ensure a wide, accepted and efficient outreach of emergency aid.   

Support is delivered through multi-purpose cash and cash-for-rent assistance - small grants to Community-based Organisations (CBOs) and citizen initiatives to support immediate needs in their areas – delivery of non-food items (once humanitarian corridors and convoys are secured) - hotline counselling for legal and psycho-social support - dissemination of legal information and explosive ordnance risk education leaflets through relevant channels, at border crossing points, train and bus stations and other places where civilians concentrate.  

Prior to 24 February 2022 

DRC has operated in Ukraine in 1998-2000 and 2007-2013, focusing on the resettlement of Tartars returning to Crimea from Central Asia, and on developing the capacities of Ukrainian asylum authorities and civil society working with child refugees. DRC resumed its operations in Ukraine in November 2014 to respond to the growing humanitarian needs in the country. 

DRC previous projects in Ukraine have included multiple sectors, seeking to maximise positive impacts and address a variety of individual needs. This has entailed small business grants, individual legal counselling and in court if needed. Throughout, DRC has been engaged in advocacy designed to improve livelihoods and access to basic services among conflict-affected people primarily in the eastern Ukraine.  

In communities where mine clearance operations have taken place, residents have benefitted from agro-pastoral business support from DRC’s livelihoods programme and critical and social infrastructure support from DRC’s protection team. DRC has worked with national authorities in building their capacity to respond to the needs of internally displaced and other conflict-affected persons.  

Contact

Gerry Garvey

Executive Director Asia and Europe

[email protected]

Brieuc Le Merle

Country Director

[email protected]
Ukraine

Ukrayina Office

[email protected]

Urgent Action Needed

Guidance on Border Crossings

Legal Alerts

The Conflict in Ukraine

3.4 million people in eastern Ukraine are in need of humanitarian assistance. People in Ukraine need: • Educational interventions • Interventions to improve people’s food security and livelihoods (FSL) • Health interventions • Interventions in the area of protection • Interventions in the shelter and non-food items sector (Shelter/NFI) • Interventions in the water, sanitation and hygiene sector (WASH) • Programmes providing multipurpose cash assistance (MPC)

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Snapshots

Looking ahead

These two boys were born and raised in Ukraine. Their father was killed when his tractor was blown up by a landmine buried in his field. Now the family lives sparingly on the mother's income from the sale of milk and cheese, which comes from two cows. The Danish Refugee Council has helped the family with necessary repairs and maintenance of their house, and given them two beds and a table that they would not otherwise be able to afford. In addition to support of livelihood, the Danish Refugee Council also runs a wide range of other activities in Ukraine, including humanitarian mine clearance.

Looking ahead

These two boys were born and raised in Ukraine. Their father was killed when his tractor was blown up by a landmine buried in his field. Now the family lives sparingly on the mother's income from the sale of milk and cheese, which comes from two cows. The Danish Refugee Council has helped the family with necessary repairs and maintenance of their house, and given them two beds and a table that they would not otherwise be able to afford. In addition to support of livelihood, the Danish Refugee Council also runs a wide range of other activities in Ukraine, including humanitarian mine clearance.

SK 07880
From Mines to Milk 💣🐄 #integrated #mineaction

#Cattlefarmers in Komyshuvakha #Ukraine only get water 4x a day for 15 min. Their key communal #waterwell is broken - and located between #minefields. Complicated #landproperty issues further prevented interventions. At #DanishRefugeeCouncil, with support from the #EuropeanUnion, we integrated our versatile expertise for a holistic response: ✔#demining began with clearance ✔#legal resolved the HLP problem ✔#protection engaged a local repair company ✔#EORE delivered mine safety session to repairmen ✔#livelihoods distributed cash grants to farmers "We are there, moving forward together."

From Mines to Milk 💣🐄 #integrated #mineaction

#Cattlefarmers in Komyshuvakha #Ukraine only get water 4x a day for 15 min. Their key communal #waterwell is broken - and located between #minefields. Complicated #landproperty issues further prevented interventions. At #DanishRefugeeCouncil, with support from the #EuropeanUnion, we integrated our versatile expertise for a holistic response: ✔#demining began with clearance ✔#legal resolved the HLP problem ✔#protection engaged a local repair company ✔#EORE delivered mine safety session to repairmen ✔#livelihoods distributed cash grants to farmers "We are there, moving forward together."

P1010847
Miners Learn about Mines

The town of Hirske (Luhanska oblast, GCA) is a ten-thousand-strong community five kilometres away from the ‘contact line’. In the vicinity, DRC-DDG identified nearly two million square metres of contamination with Explosive Ordnance (EO) and recorded over 50 mine victims over the past years. Historically, Luhanska oblast is famed for its mineral reserves and Hirske is no exception. While unemployment there remains rampant, most of the population found work at nearby coalmines. Due to years of a localised response, DRC-DDG collaborates with a variety of community gatekeepers – such as the coalmine Hirska. Providing Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) greatly benefits from the arising multiplier effect: coal miners will return home across the town and share the EORE materials and knowledge with their families and friends.

Miners Learn about Mines

The town of Hirske (Luhanska oblast, GCA) is a ten-thousand-strong community five kilometres away from the ‘contact line’. In the vicinity, DRC-DDG identified nearly two million square metres of contamination with Explosive Ordnance (EO) and recorded over 50 mine victims over the past years. Historically, Luhanska oblast is famed for its mineral reserves and Hirske is no exception. While unemployment there remains rampant, most of the population found work at nearby coalmines. Due to years of a localised response, DRC-DDG collaborates with a variety of community gatekeepers – such as the coalmine Hirska. Providing Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) greatly benefits from the arising multiplier effect: coal miners will return home across the town and share the EORE materials and knowledge with their families and friends.

Miners Learn About Mines (1)
Mine Action event in eastern Ukraine

Recently, DRC, OSCE, and UNDP organised a three-day-long Mine Action event in Mariupol, dedicated to the harmonisation of Mine Action data collection, messaging, and nationally-owned work plans. Supported by the American people through USAID, DRC and UNDP held two workshops and working groups on Victim Assistance and digital Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) on the first day. These two pillars were recognised by the Mine Action community to need more in-depth coordination. A variety of Mine Action stakeholders attended, both in-person and online, ranging from governmental institutions, vested international organisations, to local Mine Action operators in Ukraine. The workshops featured a number of presentations and discussion – including the launch of DRC’s EORE mobile Augment Reality application, EORE online courses, and a refurbished stopmina.com website. The second and third day were dedicated to the OSCE roundtable and the Mine Action Sub-Cluster meeting where DRC also actively participated.

Mine Action event in eastern Ukraine

Recently, DRC, OSCE, and UNDP organised a three-day-long Mine Action event in Mariupol, dedicated to the harmonisation of Mine Action data collection, messaging, and nationally-owned work plans. Supported by the American people through USAID, DRC and UNDP held two workshops and working groups on Victim Assistance and digital Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) on the first day. These two pillars were recognised by the Mine Action community to need more in-depth coordination. A variety of Mine Action stakeholders attended, both in-person and online, ranging from governmental institutions, vested international organisations, to local Mine Action operators in Ukraine. The workshops featured a number of presentations and discussion – including the launch of DRC’s EORE mobile Augment Reality application, EORE online courses, and a refurbished stopmina.com website. The second and third day were dedicated to the OSCE roundtable and the Mine Action Sub-Cluster meeting where DRC also actively participated.

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