Snapshots 2

New displacement during COVID-19

Despite calls for a global ceasefire amidst the COVID-19 pandemic to alleviate suffering and economic and social hardships, conflicts in Myanmar’s Northern Shan and Rakhine States have escalated since March. Thousands of civilians continue to displace and re-displace in search of safe havens, food, water and medication. Many rural communities and small villages are isolated and far from international aid and protection. DRC is working on the ground, including with local partners, to strengthen our response and find new ways to reach people in need and to alleviate the suffering in conflict-affected areas of Myanmar. We continue to see new needs for emergency aid and work to provide means and support to help people recover and cope with crisis. Today, 10 December 2020, on this year's International Human Rights Day, DRC Myanmar salutes all partners, donors and other actors who help us help people in need in Myanmar.

New displacement during COVID-19

Despite calls for a global ceasefire amidst the COVID-19 pandemic to alleviate suffering and economic and social hardships, conflicts in Myanmar’s Northern Shan and Rakhine States have escalated since March. Thousands of civilians continue to displace and re-displace in search of safe havens, food, water and medication. Many rural communities and small villages are isolated and far from international aid and protection. DRC is working on the ground, including with local partners, to strengthen our response and find new ways to reach people in need and to alleviate the suffering in conflict-affected areas of Myanmar. We continue to see new needs for emergency aid and work to provide means and support to help people recover and cope with crisis. Today, 10 December 2020, on this year's International Human Rights Day, DRC Myanmar salutes all partners, donors and other actors who help us help people in need in Myanmar.

Macadam Road Construction In Pin Lin Pyin Village
2020: The year of conflict and armed violence in Ituri Province

Many people around the world will remember 2020 as the year the Covid-19 pandemic destabilised our lives. In the Ituri province of DR Congo however, the pandemic was not nearly as deadly as conflict and armed violence. Sifa, Chantal, Marie, Julie and Maman Silué will remember 2020 as the year of extreme violence. During the first half of the year, 9 massacres perpetuated by armed groups were recorded in Djugu and Mahagi, in Ituri province, DR Congo. These were accompanied by continuous attacks, ambushes and lootings carried out by the numerous armed groups operating in the area. Conflict and violence do not only affect people’s physical safety but also their livelihoods, social cohesion and education, which are key elements to resilience and peacebuilding. With the technical and financial support of EU Humanitarian Aid, we implemented a project to help communities cope and rebuild their lives. Sifa, one of the beneficiaries of the project, is an adolescent girl dreaming of a normal life. A year ago, she flee her home when armed groups attacked her village and her family lost everything. She now lives with a host family which helps her get back on her feet. We provided psychological support, school support and raised awareness about the importance of education for adolescent girls, activities that enabled girls like Sifa to return to school and make new friends. In Djugu territory, the wounds are still deep and fresh. Chantal is busy caring for her daughter's newborn baby, conceived after being raped by an arm carrier, as she fled violence in Ituri, DR Congo. She takes care of the baby while her daughter recovers from the shock. Unfortunately, she is not alone, in 2020, we supported more than 90 women and girls raped in similar conditions. Still, little or no attention has been paid to the traumatic consequences of this violent acts causing pain to many people in the community. Maman Silué is the project's manager. Every day, she meets men, women and children traumatised by violence. The psychosocial and financial support we offer affected families enables them to cope with the traumas as they aspire to rebuild their lives. When asked why she chose to work in Fataki, she explains, "When I was young, I was almost raped. I was scared. I wanted to drop out of school. My father supported me and all my life, I tried to defend myself. Now I want to defend other women and girls". Maman Siliué is a grandmother of four, three of whom are little girls. Through her work, she also tries to protect them. Together with Maman Siliué, Marie and Julie work together to raise awareness about women and children's rights. Through this EU Humanitarian Aid funded project, nearly 400 people, who have experienced traumatic events, have been supported by our teams. More than 3,000 children have also benefited from this project. The psychosocial support - through direct intervention, social interaction or provided through child friendly spaces - is essential to creating a favourable environment for healing and forgiveness. Too often, the mental health of individuals and the resilience of communities is undermined. Without a strong commitment to enable individuals and communities to rebuild themselves, violence and its consequences are likely to ruin many lives.

2020: The year of conflict and armed violence in Ituri Province

Many people around the world will remember 2020 as the year the Covid-19 pandemic destabilised our lives. In the Ituri province of DR Congo however, the pandemic was not nearly as deadly as conflict and armed violence. Sifa, Chantal, Marie, Julie and Maman Silué will remember 2020 as the year of extreme violence. During the first half of the year, 9 massacres perpetuated by armed groups were recorded in Djugu and Mahagi, in Ituri province, DR Congo. These were accompanied by continuous attacks, ambushes and lootings carried out by the numerous armed groups operating in the area. Conflict and violence do not only affect people’s physical safety but also their livelihoods, social cohesion and education, which are key elements to resilience and peacebuilding. With the technical and financial support of EU Humanitarian Aid, we implemented a project to help communities cope and rebuild their lives. Sifa, one of the beneficiaries of the project, is an adolescent girl dreaming of a normal life. A year ago, she flee her home when armed groups attacked her village and her family lost everything. She now lives with a host family which helps her get back on her feet. We provided psychological support, school support and raised awareness about the importance of education for adolescent girls, activities that enabled girls like Sifa to return to school and make new friends. In Djugu territory, the wounds are still deep and fresh. Chantal is busy caring for her daughter's newborn baby, conceived after being raped by an arm carrier, as she fled violence in Ituri, DR Congo. She takes care of the baby while her daughter recovers from the shock. Unfortunately, she is not alone, in 2020, we supported more than 90 women and girls raped in similar conditions. Still, little or no attention has been paid to the traumatic consequences of this violent acts causing pain to many people in the community. Maman Silué is the project's manager. Every day, she meets men, women and children traumatised by violence. The psychosocial and financial support we offer affected families enables them to cope with the traumas as they aspire to rebuild their lives. When asked why she chose to work in Fataki, she explains, "When I was young, I was almost raped. I was scared. I wanted to drop out of school. My father supported me and all my life, I tried to defend myself. Now I want to defend other women and girls". Maman Siliué is a grandmother of four, three of whom are little girls. Through her work, she also tries to protect them. Together with Maman Siliué, Marie and Julie work together to raise awareness about women and children's rights. Through this EU Humanitarian Aid funded project, nearly 400 people, who have experienced traumatic events, have been supported by our teams. More than 3,000 children have also benefited from this project. The psychosocial support - through direct intervention, social interaction or provided through child friendly spaces - is essential to creating a favourable environment for healing and forgiveness. Too often, the mental health of individuals and the resilience of communities is undermined. Without a strong commitment to enable individuals and communities to rebuild themselves, violence and its consequences are likely to ruin many lives.

Tweet5 Hope
After her fist certificate in English Zahra aims for more!

Zahra Foroughi arrived in Greece three years ago and joined the DRC English courses when she moved in Koutsochero hosting site. DRC has been offering non formal education courses for refugee adults in nine mainland camps in 2020. After hard work and with her teacher’s support, she passed her first exam. This means she can understand matters encountered in work, school, or leisure. She can also deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling and she is able to describe her experiences, ambitions, and dreams. Zahra continues to study English and wants to be an architect. She thinks women should not be afraid to dream big. “I believe women should persist, be better informed and learn different languages,” she says.

After her fist certificate in English Zahra aims for more!

Zahra Foroughi arrived in Greece three years ago and joined the DRC English courses when she moved in Koutsochero hosting site. DRC has been offering non formal education courses for refugee adults in nine mainland camps in 2020. After hard work and with her teacher’s support, she passed her first exam. This means she can understand matters encountered in work, school, or leisure. She can also deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling and she is able to describe her experiences, ambitions, and dreams. Zahra continues to study English and wants to be an architect. She thinks women should not be afraid to dream big. “I believe women should persist, be better informed and learn different languages,” she says.

Greece Zahra Koutsochero
HELIOS National Sensitization Campaign

Μπορούμε να δώσουμε πολλά ο ένας στον άλλο. Κυρίως τον καλύτερό μας εαυτό.

HELIOS National Sensitization Campaign

Μπορούμε να δώσουμε πολλά ο ένας στον άλλο. Κυρίως τον καλύτερό μας εαυτό.

A challenging year

2020 was a challenging year. But we tried hard.

A challenging year

2020 was a challenging year. But we tried hard.

Refugees are in need of legal aid in Greece

Refugees and asylum seekers need support to navigate the asylum system, to access documentation or reunite with family members. DRC has provided legal aid services in Greece since 2016.

Refugees are in need of legal aid in Greece

Refugees and asylum seekers need support to navigate the asylum system, to access documentation or reunite with family members. DRC has provided legal aid services in Greece since 2016.

When I grow up

Refugee students in love going to school, being with their friends, and dream of what they will be when they grow up. And they give us a taste!

When I grow up

Refugee students in love going to school, being with their friends, and dream of what they will be when they grow up. And they give us a taste!

Refugee mothers in Greece

What does it mean to be a mother? Refugee women in Greece share their experience.

Refugee mothers in Greece

What does it mean to be a mother? Refugee women in Greece share their experience.

Cultural Mediators support refugees in Greece

Cultural mediators in Greece support refugees in and out of camp settings. They are there to interpret, mediate, explain and help them navigate the Greek public services and their new surroundings.

Cultural Mediators support refugees in Greece

Cultural mediators in Greece support refugees in and out of camp settings. They are there to interpret, mediate, explain and help them navigate the Greek public services and their new surroundings.

Miners Learn about Mines

The town of Hirske (Luhanska oblast, GCA) is a ten-thousand-strong community five kilometres away from the ‘contact line’. In the vicinity, DRC-DDG identified nearly two million square metres of contamination with Explosive Ordnance (EO) and recorded over 50 mine victims over the past years. Historically, Luhanska oblast is famed for its mineral reserves and Hirske is no exception. While unemployment there remains rampant, most of the population found work at nearby coalmines. Due to years of a localised response, DRC-DDG collaborates with a variety of community gatekeepers – such as the coalmine Hirska. Providing Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) greatly benefits from the arising multiplier effect: coal miners will return home across the town and share the EORE materials and knowledge with their families and friends.

Miners Learn about Mines

The town of Hirske (Luhanska oblast, GCA) is a ten-thousand-strong community five kilometres away from the ‘contact line’. In the vicinity, DRC-DDG identified nearly two million square metres of contamination with Explosive Ordnance (EO) and recorded over 50 mine victims over the past years. Historically, Luhanska oblast is famed for its mineral reserves and Hirske is no exception. While unemployment there remains rampant, most of the population found work at nearby coalmines. Due to years of a localised response, DRC-DDG collaborates with a variety of community gatekeepers – such as the coalmine Hirska. Providing Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) greatly benefits from the arising multiplier effect: coal miners will return home across the town and share the EORE materials and knowledge with their families and friends.

Miners Learn About Mines (1)
A Frequent Flyer
Title A Frequent Flyer; Mixed Media On Canvas; Size 19X19 Inch

Mixed media on canvas; 19x19 in.

A Frequent Flyer

Mixed media on canvas; 19x19 in.

Title A Frequent Flyer; Mixed Media On Canvas; Size 19X19 Inch
She Paints her Deam House
Title She Paints Her Dream House; Medium Mixed Media On Canvas; Size 19X19 Inch

Mixed media on canvas; 19x19 in.

She Paints her Deam House

Mixed media on canvas; 19x19 in.

Title She Paints Her Dream House; Medium Mixed Media On Canvas; Size 19X19 Inch
Twin Brothers’ Joy
Title Twin Brothers' Joy; Medium Mixed Media On Canvas; Size Size 37.5X37.5 Inch

Mixed media on canvas; 37.5x37.5 in.

Twin Brothers’ Joy

Mixed media on canvas; 37.5x37.5 in.

Title Twin Brothers' Joy; Medium Mixed Media On Canvas; Size Size 37.5X37.5 Inch
The Joy of Flying-II
Title The Joy Of Flying II; Medium Ink Water Color On Paper; Size 16X11.5 Inch

Medium ink watercolor on paper; 16x11.5 in.

The Joy of Flying-II

Medium ink watercolor on paper; 16x11.5 in.

Title The Joy Of Flying II; Medium Ink Water Color On Paper; Size 16X11.5 Inch
DRC Bangladesh Covid-19 Awareness - 'Hygienic Use of Cloth Mask' Rohingya w English subtitles

This is an instructional animated video about 'Hygienic use of cloth mask', for both Rohingya and Bangladeshi host community living in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. In this video, the proper ways of using mask are narrated with detailed supporting visuals using communicative local dialect for both communities to understand easily.

DRC Bangladesh Covid-19 Awareness - 'Hygienic Use of Cloth Mask' Rohingya w English subtitles

This is an instructional animated video about 'Hygienic use of cloth mask', for both Rohingya and Bangladeshi host community living in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. In this video, the proper ways of using mask are narrated with detailed supporting visuals using communicative local dialect for both communities to understand easily.

Mine Action event in eastern Ukraine

Recently, DRC, OSCE, and UNDP organised a three-day-long Mine Action event in Mariupol, dedicated to the harmonisation of Mine Action data collection, messaging, and nationally-owned work plans. Supported by the American people through USAID, DRC and UNDP held two workshops and working groups on Victim Assistance and digital Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) on the first day. These two pillars were recognised by the Mine Action community to need more in-depth coordination. A variety of Mine Action stakeholders attended, both in-person and online, ranging from governmental institutions, vested international organisations, to local Mine Action operators in Ukraine. The workshops featured a number of presentations and discussion – including the launch of DRC’s EORE mobile Augment Reality application, EORE online courses, and a refurbished stopmina.com website. The second and third day were dedicated to the OSCE roundtable and the Mine Action Sub-Cluster meeting where DRC also actively participated.

Mine Action event in eastern Ukraine

Recently, DRC, OSCE, and UNDP organised a three-day-long Mine Action event in Mariupol, dedicated to the harmonisation of Mine Action data collection, messaging, and nationally-owned work plans. Supported by the American people through USAID, DRC and UNDP held two workshops and working groups on Victim Assistance and digital Explosive Ordnance Risk Education (EORE) on the first day. These two pillars were recognised by the Mine Action community to need more in-depth coordination. A variety of Mine Action stakeholders attended, both in-person and online, ranging from governmental institutions, vested international organisations, to local Mine Action operators in Ukraine. The workshops featured a number of presentations and discussion – including the launch of DRC’s EORE mobile Augment Reality application, EORE online courses, and a refurbished stopmina.com website. The second and third day were dedicated to the OSCE roundtable and the Mine Action Sub-Cluster meeting where DRC also actively participated.

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Mariam, Nagwa and Sahar

This is Mariam, Nagwa and Sahar. Mariam is one of our staff members in the Markazi camp in Djibouti. Nagwa and Sahar are refugees from the war in Yemen. They work as volunteers in the camp where they speak with female refugees about their rights and possibilities in terms of help and support. Nagwa and Sahar like working for the DRC because it enables them to leave their camp homes and do something meaningful. “If I just sit at home doing nothing, I get bad thoughts about the war and everything that has happened to me and my family in Yemen,” says Nagwa.

Mariam, Nagwa and Sahar

This is Mariam, Nagwa and Sahar. Mariam is one of our staff members in the Markazi camp in Djibouti. Nagwa and Sahar are refugees from the war in Yemen. They work as volunteers in the camp where they speak with female refugees about their rights and possibilities in terms of help and support. Nagwa and Sahar like working for the DRC because it enables them to leave their camp homes and do something meaningful. “If I just sit at home doing nothing, I get bad thoughts about the war and everything that has happened to me and my family in Yemen,” says Nagwa.

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Seeking safety in Bosnia

Thousands of people have made their way to Bosnia and Herzegovina in search of a life without hunger, deprivation, and danger. They come from poverty-stricken and war-torn countries such as Syria, Pakistan, Iraq and Afghanistan. Many are forced to take shelter in abandoned buildings because the official reception centres are overcrowded, and many are plagued by illnesses, infections or injuries from violence. Several say they have attempted to cross the border into Croatia. Here they have been subjected to violence, robbed of their clothes and have had their belongings destroyed before being sent back across the border. The Danish Refugee Council is present in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where we distribute water, food, warm clothes, tents, and medicine. Pictured above, one of our staff members provides first aid to a man whose hand has been seriously injured.

Seeking safety in Bosnia

Thousands of people have made their way to Bosnia and Herzegovina in search of a life without hunger, deprivation, and danger. They come from poverty-stricken and war-torn countries such as Syria, Pakistan, Iraq and Afghanistan. Many are forced to take shelter in abandoned buildings because the official reception centres are overcrowded, and many are plagued by illnesses, infections or injuries from violence. Several say they have attempted to cross the border into Croatia. Here they have been subjected to violence, robbed of their clothes and have had their belongings destroyed before being sent back across the border. The Danish Refugee Council is present in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where we distribute water, food, warm clothes, tents, and medicine. Pictured above, one of our staff members provides first aid to a man whose hand has been seriously injured.

Bosnia DRC51
Water in Somalia

In Somalia, poverty and drought are constantly causing enormous needs for humanitarian relief. The Danish Refugee Council is present with a wide range of efforts throughout the country. Our employees work tirelessly to: • Meet immediate needs by providing lifesaving services in a timely, dignified and appropriate manner. • Increase access to clean drinking water and improve access to hygiene and sanitation facilities through the distribution of hygiene kits and hygiene education. • Improve access to shelter, food and other life-saving relief for people in emergencies and crises. • Improve protection for children and women, e.g. through extensive case management and assistance for reunification. Pictured above, a boy fills up a water canister at a water supply built by the Danish Refugee Council near the town of Dollow.

Water in Somalia

In Somalia, poverty and drought are constantly causing enormous needs for humanitarian relief. The Danish Refugee Council is present with a wide range of efforts throughout the country. Our employees work tirelessly to: • Meet immediate needs by providing lifesaving services in a timely, dignified and appropriate manner. • Increase access to clean drinking water and improve access to hygiene and sanitation facilities through the distribution of hygiene kits and hygiene education. • Improve access to shelter, food and other life-saving relief for people in emergencies and crises. • Improve protection for children and women, e.g. through extensive case management and assistance for reunification. Pictured above, a boy fills up a water canister at a water supply built by the Danish Refugee Council near the town of Dollow.

Watering Point Outside Dollow 34236591873 O
Child friendly space in Tanzania

In DRC’s 'child friendly spaces', children can come and stay in a safe environment. Our staff provide care and activities for the children, so that for a while they are allowed to forget everyday life and perhaps bad memories of war and flight. In Tanzania, hundreds of thousands of people have fled the civil war in Burundi. Both mothers and children enjoy coming and having a break in one of our child friendly spaces.

Child friendly space in Tanzania

In DRC’s 'child friendly spaces', children can come and stay in a safe environment. Our staff provide care and activities for the children, so that for a while they are allowed to forget everyday life and perhaps bad memories of war and flight. In Tanzania, hundreds of thousands of people have fled the civil war in Burundi. Both mothers and children enjoy coming and having a break in one of our child friendly spaces.

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